Children Should Never Know Poverty Like This

“I want to share everything I have learnt with kids who are like me” – Heunice


Children should never know poverty like this

Heunice had heard the voice of poverty begin to whisper in her, and her entire family’s ears. It made her feel total despair, hopelessness, and anger.

Thankfully Heunice’s life didn’t follow the dark path of poverty for very long.

The truth is, empowering a child to overcome poverty is not as complex as you may think. Or perhaps, even as expensive.

By helping one person battling poverty to meet their basic necessities and receive much needed church-based support, you begin to stop the spread of poverty’s insidious roots.


The Results of the Study Were Stunning (A Holistic Approach to Eradicating Poverty)

There are many facets to poverty:

  •   The need for everyday resources such as food and clothing
  •   The need for regular and emergency medical care
  •   The need for safer and family-oriented communities
  •   The need to provide education and career training for youth
  •   The need to provide solid spiritual and emotional support for children and families

When you look at this list, you may feel overwhelmed. How do you find a charity that provides all of this support? And how do you know that the charity is trustworthy?

Compassion has created a holistic approach to eradicating poverty, one child, one family and community at a time. We didn’t just want to feed someone for a day - we wanted to see wide reaching and lasting positive impact on families and communities in poverty.

kenyan school kids

To ensure that this was happening, we took part in an independent study* to track the progress of our charitable initiatives. We wanted to be sure that children like Heunice move onto a better stage of life, after having been sponsored through the Compassion programme.

The Results of the Study Were Stunning:

  •   Compassion graduates were 13% more likely to finish primary school and 41.6% more likely to finish secondary school.
  •   Compassion graduates were 14-18% more likely to have employment as adults and 35% more likely to secure white collar employment.
  •   Compassion graduates were on average 30 to 75% more likely to become community leaders and 40 to 70% more likely to be involved in church leadership as adults.

By becoming a sponsor of a child like Heunice, for 92p a day you help to provide:

  •   The chance to go to school
  •   Medical check-ups and support
  •   Vocational training
  •   The opportunity to be nurtured by a local church community
  •   Letters (from you!) translated into their native language
  •   A one-to-one relationship with you, their only sponsor


I want to share everything I have learned with kids who are like me
-- Heunice


Heunice, and many children like her around the world, have had their lives completely transformed from a sponsor making the simple commitment of giving £28 a month and sending caring letters.

As Heunice shared in her story, “I want to share everything I have learnt with kids who are like me. I want them to feel the joy of having a sponsor–to get a letter that says ‘I love, you are special to me.’ With the help of our sponsors we can grow up and finish our studies.”

Resolving poverty starts by strategically and positively changing and supporting the life of one person at a time. Compassion has proved this again and again through the incredible stories of sponsored children – like Heunice.

You can make a difference by sponsoring a child like Heunice today. 

 



WORDS : Compassion UK

PHOTOS : Compassion UK


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